27-1: “Tribal College Communities” Table of Contents

27-1 TRIBAL COLLEGE COMMUNITIES

Features

Engaging Life: TCUs and their Role Building Community
By Cheryl Crazy Bull
The tribal college founders sought to establish institutions rooted in place, extending beyond academic and workforce education. They dreamed of colleges and universities that served as centers of tribal and community life. In this feature article, the president and CEO of the American Indian College Fund recounts some of the ways that TCUs engage with their communities.TCJ PAID CONTENT

TCJ Student
Edited by LeAnne Howe
The decorated author and distinguished scholar from the Choctaw Nation presents the winners of this year’s student writing contest and reflects on how the writing of today’s tribal college students is part of a greater tribalography.

Lighting the Way: Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College Serves as a Beacon Light for Tribal Members
By Sherrole Benton
Following the ravages of colonization and territorial loss, the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community has striven to develop an institution that serves as a gathering place and as a bastion of culture and language—a role which their tribal college has fulfilled for students and community members alike.TCJ PAID CONTENT

Barrow’s Living Room: How a Tribal College Library Connects Communities across the Arctic
By Erin Hollingsworth
More than just storerooms of information, tribal college libraries are gathering spaces that bring people together. The Tuzzy Consortium Library in Barrow, Alaska offers programs and services that build community at IIisagvik College and beyond.TCJ PAID CONTENT

Departments

Dear Readers: 2015 TCJ Student Competition Gets Better and Better
By Rachael Marchbanks

Letters to the Editor

Editor’s Essay: The Unquantifiable Value of Tribal Colleges
By Bradley Shreve

On Campus: Tribal College News

Talking Circle: Oshki Bimaadiziiwin: Restoring Balance through Education
By Patricia Hemming and Patrick Shields
Connecting with the community often means reaching out to the most marginalized individuals. Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College has done just that in developing a new program that paves a road to redemption for Native inmates in Wisconsin’s state prisons. TCJ PAID CONTENT

Media Reviews
With contributions from Carmelita Lamb, Leola Tsinnajinnie, Gregory E. Smoak, and Jon Carver.

ON THE COVER: Three Women by R.C. Gorman (Diné). Courtesy of the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Web Exclusive

Unlocking the Past: The O’odham Oral History Project Keeps Language and Culture Alive
By Martha S. Lee
Tohono O’odham Community College rediscovers elders’ oral histories, archiving and preserving them for future generations.

Canada’s Tribal Colleges
By Leif Gregersen
In this web-exclusive, four-part series, TCJ profiles First Nations colleges north of the border. Nicola Valley Institute of Technology and the Native Education College in British Columbia are highlighted in this first installment.

Resource Guide
By Cheryl Crazy Bull