The Magazine

26-1: “Celebrating 25 Years” Table of Contents

Aug 14th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

Features Origin Story: The Genesis of Tribal College Journal By Paul Boyer TCJ founder and former editor, Paul Boyer, looks back at the origins of the journal and the tribal college movement, meditating on how youthful exuberance—and naivety—are often essential ingredients for action. Launching Lives of Service: We Honor 25 Outstanding Tribal College Alumni By (more)

25-4: “Nation Building” Table of Contents

May 1st, 2014 | By | Comments Off

Nation building is a multi-faceted process in which tribal colleges and universities are increasingly playing an important role. Discover how TCUs have devised strategies and programs that strengthen and expand the economic, political, and social foundations of the First Nations.

25-3: “Preserving and Protecting Knowledge” Table of Contents

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | Comments Off

Features Like a Thunderbird By Rhonda LeValdo-Gayton Preserving and protecting traditional knowledge remains a cornerstone principle at all tribal colleges and universities. Today, they are employing a variety of strategies to fulfill that mission. A Hundred Ways of Learning By Martha Lee At Tohono O’odham Community College, faculty and administrators ask how the college’s curriculum (more)

25-2: “Tribal and Behavioral Health” Table of Contents

Oct 31st, 2013 | By | No Comments »

Features Healing Ourselves By Cheryl Crazy Bull For over 40 years, tribal colleges and universities have devised innovative programs to address behavioral and tribal health. Cheryl Crazy Bull, president and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, looks back at the progress made and details current strategies and initiatives. Working Together: Wellness and Academic Achievement (more)

25-1: “Art & Symbolism” Table of Contents

Aug 11th, 2013 | By | Comments Off

Artists across Indian Country are constantly evolving and their work defies any single label or category. In this quarter’s edition of Tribal College Journal our writers highlight the changing nature of student expression shaped by a contemporary worldview that respects the past, present, and future.

24-4: “Language Revitalization” Table of Contents

May 15th, 2013 | By | No Comments »

Features More Than Words, A Way of Life By Laura Paskus From the Arctic Circle to the Great Plains, tribal colleges and universities are launching a vast array of new programs to revitalize and preserve Native languages. Ojibwemotaadidaa: Preparing a New Generation of Fluent Speakers By Persia Erdrich Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College’s (more)

24-3: “The Science of Place” Table of Contents

Feb 25th, 2013 | By | No Comments »

All across Indian Country, tribal college students and faculty members are conducting scientific research on their homelands, studying species and foods important to Native people, and seeking solutions to environmental and public health problems, practicing the “science of place.”

24-2 Winter 2012 “The Future of the Tribal College Movement” Table of Contents

Nov 6th, 2012 | By | Comments Off

With the publication of this issue, Tribal College Journal begins a year of celebrating the 40th anniversary of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC). It is an important time to pay respect to all of those who have led the way to this moment in history.

24-1 Fall 2012 “Communicating Yesterday’s Stories Today” Table of Contents

Aug 15th, 2012 | By | Comments Off

Features The Art of Storytelling By Barbara Ellen Sorensen At many tribal colleges, storytelling is an integral part of the curricula. Students learn from elders—and also learn to craft their own narratives. Stories for the Stage By Ryan Winn At the College of Menominee Nation, playwriting students learn to write their own stories, then perform (more)

23-4 Summer 2012 “Investing in Education, Empowering Tribal Communities” Table of Contents

May 15th, 2012 | By | Comments Off

Within this issue, TCJ’s writers examine the collaboration between federal agencies and tribal colleges, and explore the colleges’ larger economic impact. Students also relate their own experiences of funding their educations.