Opinion

In Wilma Mankiller We Trust: Convincing the U.S. Treasury to Celebrate Women

Apr 6th, 2015 | By | No Comments »
By Ryan Winn

I’m asking you to add your voice to a movement. It’s called “Women on 20s,” and its goal is to put a woman’s face on paper currency. The process for change is simple: A sitting United States president can change a bill’s portrait with the stroke of a pen. When a young girl asked President (more)

An Open Letter

Mar 2nd, 2015 | By | No Comments »
By Ryan Winn

Dear Ms. Sarah Butrymowicz of The Hechinger Report, I’m still waiting for your retraction. It’s been more than three months since you published your deeply flawed article, “Tribal colleges give poor return on more than $100 million a year in federal money,” and I’m waiting for you to admit to cherry-picking quotes and arriving at (more)

Thinking Globally

Feb 19th, 2015 | By | No Comments »
By Bradley Shreve

By Bradley Shreve
By searching globally and acting in unison, Indigenous peoples can achieve impossible things.

Hene’enovohostotse (Learning)

Feb 19th, 2015 | By | No Comments »
By Richard Littlebear, Ed.D.

By Richard Littlebear
International learning experiences can be immensely rewarding for tribal college students. TCJ PAID CONTENT

Taking the World-Wide View

Feb 19th, 2015 | By | No Comments »
By James Shanley

Indigenous people all over the world have faced similar historical traumas due to colonization. It is impossible, for example, to read the history of the New Zealand Maoris and not see a parallel to Native tribes in the United States and Canada. Newer tribal colleges may not be familiar with the historical, international interests and (more)

Native Characters in Children’s Books, Part Two: Pathfinders

Jan 6th, 2015 | By | No Comments »
By Ryan Winn

There’s a diversity shortage in children’s literature. The University of Wisconsin-Madison revealed that 92.1% of the 5,000 books published in 2013 featured White characters, while only 1% featured American Indians. An unnamed children’s book executive responded to these statistics by claiming the discrepancy could be blamed on poor sales, stating, “If we thought there was (more)

Native Characters in Children’s Books, Part One: Rush Revere

Dec 1st, 2014 | By | No Comments »
By Ryan Winn

It’s disappointing that just 1% of the 5,000 children’s books published annually feature an American Indian character. But it’s alarming how some of those Native characters are portrayed. In the past two years, conservative pundit Rush Limbaugh published three books as installments in his #1 New York Times–bestselling series, Time-Travel Adventures with Exceptional Americans. With (more)

On the Workforce in Tribal America

Nov 9th, 2014 | By | No Comments »
By David M. Gipp

Beginnings I recall how we started out in 1972 and 1973 in disparate and humble beginnings as the first six tribally controlled colleges in the United States. We served fewer than 1,500 students in 1974, but we knew these new American Indian students represented a first entry among U.S.-based, postsecondary education students. It was a (more)

Forging the Future

Nov 9th, 2014 | By | No Comments »
By Bradley Shreve

While American Indian communities still experience economic underdevelopment and high unemployment, strides have been made. And tribal colleges and universities are playing an instrumental role in developing a workforce and paving the way to a brighter future.

“Being a Fed”

Nov 9th, 2014 | By | No Comments »
By John Gritts

John Gritts reflects on the importance of community among the tribal colleges and reflects on his years of experience working for the U.S. Department of Education. TCJ PAID CONTENT