Book/Media Reviews

Waterbuster

Nov 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

Written, edited and produced by J. Carlos Peinado & Daphne D. Ross Directed by J. Carlos Peinado VisionMaker Video (2006) 57 minutes Review by Ryan Tafoya In 1953, when the U.S. government built the Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota, it wiped out the town of Independence. And if you were (more)

Bringing Memory Forward: Storied Remembrance in Social Justice Education with Teachers

Nov 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

By Teresa Strong-Wilson Peter Lang Publishing (2008) Review by Michael W. Simpson Research shows that white teachers are the most resistant learners when it comes to challenging white privilege and power. Indeed, within our schools, we have been offering new curricula without achieving much actual change. So, how will white teachers ever change? Bringing Memory (more)

Reel Injun: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian

Nov 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

Directed by Neil Diamond Rezolution Pictures, National Film Board of Canada (2009) 85 minutes Review by Kurt Umbhau In the film, Reel Injun, filmmaker Neil Diamond (Cree) drives his rez car on a cross-country tour researching the origins and evolution of how American Indians are depicted in Hollywood films. The documentary includes several clips from (more)

Patterns of Exchange: Navajo Weavers and Traders

May 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

By Teresa J. Wilkins University of Oklahoma Press (2008) Review by Deborah Kelley-Galin Teresa J. Wilkins’s Patterns of Exchange: Navajo Weavers and Traders reconciles the “inherently biased” Euro-American historical perspective with the traditional knowledge of the Navajo people. She offers a meticulously researched account of how longestablished patterns of Native American trade were manipulated, first (more)

March Point

May 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

A Native Lens film by Longhouse Media (2008), 56 minutes Directed by Annie Silverstein, Tracy Rector (Seminole), Cody Cayou (Swinomish), Nick Clark (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde), and Travis Tom (Swinomish/Lummi). Review by Janet Freeman The strength of March Point lies in the fact it’s impossible to decide which is more gripping: witnessing a resurrection (more)

William Wayne Red Hat, Jr.: Cheyenne Keeper of the Arrows

May 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

By William Wayne Red Hat, Jr. Edited by Sibylle M. Schlesier University of Oklahoma Press (2008) Review by Eleanor Kuhl This thoughtful, 156-page book features the personal testimony of a Cheyenne spiritual leader whose most urgent concern is the perpetuation of his tribe’s cultural identity. In his various narratives, Bill Red Hat, Jr., speaks about (more)

Racism in Indian Country

May 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

By Dean Chavers, Ph.D. Peter Lang Publishing (2009) Review by David Blaine Dr. Dean Chavers highlights the many aspects of this insidious disease that plagues our planet. We are all aware of the racial epithets and slurs, as well as the jokes and comedy routines that seem to be status quo. Our “sacred” political and (more)

Blended Nation: Portraits and Interviews of Mixed-Race America

May 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

By Mike Tauber and Pamela Singh Channel Photographics (2010) Review by Cindy Conway The old saying “you can’t judge a book by its cover” is especially fitting to Blended Nation. It examines the concept of race in America through a collection of photographs accompanied by personal essays describing the subjects’ experiences stemming from being bior (more)

Everything You Know About Indians Is Wrong

Feb 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

By Paul Chaat Smith University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis (2009) Review by Michael W. Simpson Growing up in Oklahoma City, I remember the furniture store that encouraged our patronage because they “loved folks.” In his book, Everything You Know About Indians Is Wrong, Paul Chaat Smith reminds us how the dominant culture in all of (more)

Education, Decolonization, and Development: Perspectives from Asia, Africa, and the Americas

Feb 15th, 2010 | By | No Comments »

Edited by Dip Kapoor Sense Publishers, Rotterdam (2009) Review by Michael W. Simpson The editor, Dip Kapoor, has collected a wonderfully diverse set of writings that reminds us of the local struggle within the global context of the neocolonial, imperialistic project often referred to as globalization. As Native Nations struggle with so-called development, important questions (more)