Book/Media Reviews

Thinking in Indian: A John Mohawk Reader

May 13th, 2011 | | No Comments »

Edited By Jose Barreiro Fulcrum Press (2010) Review by Michael W. Simpson If you could obtain only two books to start an American Indian Studies section for your library, Spirit and Reason: A Vine Deloria, Jr. Reader would be the first purchase. The second would be Thinking in Indian: A John Mohawk Reader. In fact, (more)

The Quest for Citizenship: African American and Native American Education in Kansas, 1880-1935

May 13th, 2011 | | No Comments »

By Kim Cary Warren University of North Carolina Press (2010) Review by Michael W. Simpson The basic premise of the book is that the attempts by White “reformers” to define citizenship roles for African Americans and American Indians through schooling failed because students used that very schooling to develop skills and knowledge that allowed them (more)

A History of American Indian Achievement (DVD Series)

May 13th, 2011 | | No Comments »

Directed by: Ron Meyer Ambrose DVD (2008); Four Discs, 240 Minutes Review by Ryan Winn Hosted by actor Tyler Christopher (Choctaw/Seneca), “A History of American Indian Achievement” is divided into three sections that collectively survey the contributions of American Indians from prehistoric through modern times. The first section focuses on pre-contact civilizations and highlights how (more)

X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent

May 13th, 2011 | | No Comments »

By Scott Richard Lyons University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis (2010) Review by Ryan Winn Blending personal narrative, scholarly research, and critical theory, X-Marks explores the complexity of contemporary Native identity to make an argument for a potentially radical idea in American Indian Studies: inclusion. Author Scott Richard Lyons attacks terms that are often used by (more)

Stories Through Theories/Theories Through Stories: North American Indian Writing, Storytelling, and Critique

May 13th, 2011 | | No Comments »

Edited by Gordon D. Henry Jr., Nieves Pascual Soler, and Silvia Martínez-Falquina Michigan State University Press: East Lansing (2009) Review by Ryan Winn Stories Through Theories/Theories Through Stories is an invaluable text for scholars and courses that examine the relationship between American Indian writing and literary theory. Equal in ambition to Louis Owens’s seminal work, (more)

Dragonfly Dance

May 13th, 2011 | | No Comments »

By Denise K. Lajimodiere Michigan State University Press (2010) Review by Ryan Winn Denise Lajimodiere’s debut poetry collection, Dragonfly Dance, is an engaging read, and her words and imagery resonate long after the last page is turned. Through her crisp and unblinking eye, readers explore stories and histories of the author, her people, and the (more)

Tribal Policing: Asserting Sovereignty, Seeking Justice

Feb 15th, 2011 | | No Comments »

By Eileen Luna-Firebaugh University of Arizona Press (2007) Review by Michael W. Simpson Professor Eileen Luna-Firebaugh’s experience with tribal courts and policing are revealed in this book, along with her academic work. Law students and lawyers wanting to know more about tribal jurisdiction and how to advise tribal authorities will find it useful. It should (more)

The American Indian: Past and Present (6th edition)

Feb 15th, 2011 | | No Comments »

Edited by Roger L. Nichols University of Oklahoma Press (2008) Review by Bradley Shreve Roger L. Nichols’s classic book, The American Indian: Past and Present, has been in use since the first edition appeared in 1971. Now in its sixth edition, Nichols’s book remains as relevant as ever. Much of the reason is because Nichols (more)

Broken Landscape: Indians, Indian Tribes, and the Constitution

Feb 15th, 2011 | | No Comments »

By Frank Pommersheim Oxford University Press (2009) Review by Michael W. Simpson In a previous book, Braid of Feathers: American Indian Law and Contemporary Tribal Life (1995), Frank Pommersheim provided an inside-out view of federal Indian law. In Broken Landscapes, he provides an outside-in look at what has gone wrong within federal Indian law at (more)

How Race Survived U.S. History: From Settlement and Slavery to the Obama Phenomenon

Feb 15th, 2011 | | No Comments »

By David R. Roediger Verso (2008) Review by Michael W. Simpson With current claims of a post-racial United States and the increasing use of colorblind racism by a power elite, this book comes at an important time. It reminds us that while “the Cadillac of white supremacy has undergone centuries of model changes,” there have (more)