Book/Media Reviews

Nicholas Black Elk: Medicine Man, Missionary, Mystic

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

By Michael F. Steltenkamp University of Oklahoma Press (2009) 270 pages Review by Herman A. Peterson This is the first book-length biography to cover the life history of the famous Lakota holy man. It is based on published primary source material, interviews with Black Elk’s family and friends, as well as Roman Catholic Church records (more)

America the Beautiful

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

By Paula Gunn Allen West End Press (2010) 100 pages Review by April D. J. Petillo Whether you revere or dislike her work, any book by Paula Gunn Allen (Laguna Pueblo) is bound to elicit some response. This poetry collection, sent off to the editors at West End Press just nine days before her death, (more)

Chinuk Wawa: Kakwa Nsayka Ulmantilixam Laska Munk-k?mt?ks Nsayka/As Our Elders Teach Us to Speak It

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

By The Chinuk Wawa Dictionary Project Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon (2012) 494 pages Review by Jurgita Antoine Chinuk Wawa, also known as Chinook Jargon, originated as a pidgin trade language in the Pacific Northwest coastal region. It is based on Chinookan languages, with contributions from English and Canadian French. In (more)

The Round House

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

By Louise Erdrich, read by Gary Farmer Harper Audio (2013) 10 discs Review by Ryan Winn Perhaps the most inviting aspect of a Louise Erdrich (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) novel is that she begins each book by invoking a metaphor that is used continuously throughout her narrative. In the initial pages of the awardwinning novel, The (more)

Mobilizing Bolivia’s Displaced: Indigenous Politics and the Struggle Over Land

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

By Nicole Fabricant University of North Carolina Press (2012) 288 pages Review by Natalia Ruiz-Rubio In this case study of Movimiento Sin Tierra (MST), or the Landless Peasant Movement, Nicole Fabricant interviews activists, attends their public demonstrations, and visits their homes in the new settlements in an effort to understand this Indigenous social movement that (more)

Crazy Brave: A Memoir

Feb 6th, 2014 | By | No Comments »

By Joy Harjo W.W. Norton and Company, Inc. (2012) 208 pages Review by Michael W. Simpson Joy Harjo (Muscogee) has given us a great gift—the poetry of her life. Our responsibility is to make sure that the lessons she has to offer are received by all who are in need of them. At a time (more)

Mentoring Faculty of Color: Essays of Professional Development and Advancement in Colleges and Universities

Oct 31st, 2013 | By | No Comments »

Edited by Dwayne Mack, Elwood D. Watson, and Michelle Madsen Camacho McFarland and Company, Inc. (2012) Review by Ahmed Al-Asfour This book is a collection of essays from underrepresented faculty members who teach at various higher education institutions across the United States. The authors relate their stories about tenure promotion and professional advancement. Mentoring Faculty (more)

American Indian Educators in Reservation Schools

Oct 31st, 2013 | By | No Comments »

By Terry Huffman University of Nevada Press (2013) Review by Carmelita Lamb This is a story of optimism in the face of great social challenges, hope where positive change is barely evident, and deep faith which inspires American Indian teachers to do critically important work every day in reservation schools. This is a story about (more)

Savage Sunsets

Oct 31st, 2013 | By | No Comments »

By Adrian C. Louis West End Press (2012) Review by Jerry Worley Hoka Hey! Indeed, it is a good day to…well, read Savage Sunsets, a compilation of poems by the coolest, hippest, harshest, funniest, quixotic storyteller of all: Adrian C. Louis (Lovelock Paiute). This fully unadulterated collection of verse projects the reader into the magnificent (more)

Crooked Paths to Allotment: The Fight over Federal Indian Policy after the Civil War

Oct 31st, 2013 | By | No Comments »

By C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa University of North Carolina Press (2012) Review by Miriam R. Jackson Although the federal government’s Indian policies of dispossession and coerced assimilation won out in the 19th century with the passage of the Dawes General Allotment Act of 1887, C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa asserts that the course of history—and the development of (more)