Features

In the Service of Others: How Volunteering is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

Aug 21st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Patty Talahongva

By Patty Talahongva
Today, the spirit of volunteerism is very much alive at every tribal college and university. From fundraisers for food pantries to educational activities to help fellow students, TCUs help forge reciprocity among students and staff.

Through Our Eyes: Narratives of Three Student Volunteers at Aaniiih Nakoda College

Aug 21st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Kerri Patrick Wertz

By Kerri Patrick Wertz
Despite overwhelming familial responsibilities, work obligations, and academic demands, tribal college students embrace the passion for serving their community as volunteers. Three such stories from ANC teach us that volunteer work can coincide with individual passion and interest.

Rx for Indian Country: Tribal College Education

May 1st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Dina Horwedel

Tribal colleges and universities are working in their communities to identify factors that negatively impact health and are training the next generation of healthcare workers to deal with them. And they are making a difference—not just in the lives of their students, but in the lives of future patients.

Very Good Medicine: Indigenous Humor and Laughter

May 1st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Cynthia Lindquist with Mylo Redwater Smith

Humor is not only instinctive and a basic human need, but it is also very good medicine. Laughter boosts the immune system, lowers blood pressure, reduces stress hormones, and is linked to healthy functioning organs.

Four Legged Healers: Horse Culture as Medicine

May 1st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Jessica White Plume

For tribal communities to overcome the health disparities that plague them, they need to honor Indigenous healthcare paradigms. The Horse Nation Initiative at Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College embraces the people’s historical connection to the horse as an avenue to wellness.

Connection and Community: Diné College Emphasizes Real-World Experience in Public Health

May 1st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Mark Bauer

The Summer Research Enhancement Program offers students a solid foundation in public health research methods and a hands-on internship in their home community to test their newly acquired skills.

Struggle and Success: The State of Teacher Education at Tribal Colleges and Universities

Feb 21st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Carmelita Lamb

Today, there are many challenges that teacher education programs at tribal colleges face, including enrollment, funding, accreditation, and licensure. But the incredible dedication and determination among TCU faculty and students will help them overcome these and other obstacles. TCJ PAID CONTENT

From Wisconsin to Wyoming and Back Again: The Journey to a Bachelor’s Degree and Teacher Licensure

Feb 21st, 2016 | | No Comments »
By Susan Finkel-Hoffman

In an effort to produce homegrown educators, Wind River Tribal College forged an unlikely partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. In this memoir, the program director reminisces about some of the unexpected twists and turns that she and her students encountered. TCJ PAID CONTENT

Producing a Tribal Citizenry Literate in Law and Jurisprudence

Nov 8th, 2015 | | No Comments »
By Stephen Wall

As the most legislated people in America, tribal citizens can benefit immensely from a legal education offered from a critical and culturally specific perspective. And tribal colleges are ideally suited for the task. TCJ PAID CONTENT

Designing and Teaching an Introduction to Federal Indian Law

Nov 8th, 2015 | | No Comments »
By Wynema Morris, M.A.

There are a variety of factors that should be considered when designing the curriculum for a course on Indian law. Students should learn to read for content, interpret legal language and symbols, and gain an understanding of who makes, implements, and interprets the law. TCJ PAID CONTENT