17-3 “Heroes of Today” Resource Guide

Feb 15th, 2006 | By | Category: 17-3: Heroes of Today, Resource Guides
By Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart and Tina Deschenie

Historical Trauma and Post-Colonial Stress in American Indian Populations

Recent studies on historic and multigenerational trauma among Native people have assisted individuals and communities in dealing with the continuing after effects. Following in the footsteps of Native American elders and activists, social workers, mental health professionals, and scholars are seeking to revitalize cultural traditions to combat problems of alcoholism, drug abuse, suicide, and mental illness — all symptoms of historical trauma. Resources in this guide include relevant studies, websites, and a video. They provide information for students researching this topic, anyone interested in the healing process, and practitioners in the field.

BOOKS

Brave Heart, M.Y.H. (2004). The historical trauma response among Natives and its relationship to substance abuse: A Lakota illustration. In E. Nebelkopf & M. Phillips (Eds.), Healing and mental health for Native Americans: Speaking in red (pp. 7-18). Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.

This chapter explains historical trauma theory and the historical trauma response. Includes ways to incorporate the theory in treatment, research, and evaluation and concludes with implications for all massively traumatized populations.

Brave Heart, M.Y.H. (2001). Clinical assessment with American Indians. In R.Fong & S. Furuto (Eds.), Cultural competent social work practice: Practice skills, interventions, and evaluation (pp. 163-177). Reading, MA: Longman Publishers.

This chapter includes information about incorporating historical trauma theory in assessment.

Brave Heart, M.Y.H. (2001) Clinical interventions with American Indians. In R. Fong & S. Furuto (Eds.), Cultural competent social work practice: Practice skills, interventions, and evaluation (pp. 285-298). Reading, MA: Longman Publishers.

This chapter includes information about incorporating historical trauma theory in interventions.

Duran, E., Duran, B., Brave Heart, M.Y.H., & Yellow Horse, S.D. (1998). Healing the American Indian soul wound. In D. Yael (Ed.), International handbook of multigenerational legacies of trauma (pp. 341-354). NY: Plenum Press.

In this chapter, the authors propose the concept of historical trauma and soul wound. Topics discussed include historical legacy, survivor syndrome/survivor’s child complex, chronic and acute reactions to colonialism, and healing.

Gagné, Marie-Anik (1998). The role of dependency and colonialism in generating trauma in First Nations citizens: The James Bay Cree. In D. Yael (Ed.), International handbook of multigenerational legacies of trauma (pp. 355-372). NY: Plenum Press.

This chapter focuses on the intergenerational effects of colonization trauma and examines the process of transmitting this trauma among the Cree of James Bay in Canada.

Robin, R.W., Chester, B., and Goldman, D. (1996). Cumulative trauma and PTSD in American Indian communities. In A. Marsella, M.J. Friedman, E.T. Gerrity, & R.M. Scurfield (Eds.), Ethnocultural aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder: Issues, research, and clinical applications (pp. 239-253). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

This chapter summarizes what is known about the prevalence of psychopathology and multiple psychiatric disorders among American Indians. The current definition of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) fails to describe the impact of severe, multiple, and cumulative trauma among American Indians. They suggest other frameworks for conceptualizing the experience.

Tafoya, N. & Del Vecchio, A. (1996). Back to the future: An examination of the Native American holocaust experience. In M. McGoldrick & J. Giordano (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (2nd Ed., pp. 45-54). NY: Guilford Press.

This chapter asserts that mental health professionals must be aware of the multigenerational disruption of positive development that results from 500 years of historical trauma for Native Americans as well as the persistent destructiveness of oppression and racism. Clinicians need to educate clients about historic trauma and support them through the process of grieving personal and tribal losses of language, tradition, and religion.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.