26-1 Fall 2014 “Celebrating 25 Years” Resource Guide

Aug 14th, 2014 | By | Category: 26-1: Celebrating 25 Years, Online resource guides, Resource Guides, Web Exclusive
By Bradley Shreve

In 1989, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) collaborated with Paul Boyer to establish a journal that would allow tribal colleges and universities to share information with each other and with other organizations and institutions. Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education (TCJ) was the end product.

Over the past 25 years, the publication has evolved from a spartan black-and-white newsletter, to a full-color magazine with a variety of departments and feature articles. Some aspects of TCJ have remained the same. Boyer launched the column, “On Campus” as a regular department of tribal college news items—and it has appeared in every issue of TCJ since. Other elements of the journal have changed; there have been myriad departments that have come and gone, and the layout and graphics have transformed tremendously.

Editorially and financially, the journal has also seen great change. Boyer paid for the first issue out-of-pocket, but was able to secure support from AIHEC, the American Indian College Fund, and grants from a variety of foundations for subsequent issues. After serving seven years as editor, Boyer stepped down and Marjane Ambler stepped in. Ambler launched an array of editorial changes and also mined new funding sources. For 11 years, Ambler guided the journal through some rough and murky waters, and greatly expanded its operations and readership. Current publisher, Rachael Marchbanks, has also been instrumental in TCJ’s success. Under Ambler, she began as the journal’s advertising coordinator and eventually took charge of marketing. Seeking out new advertisers and funding opportunities, Marchbanks made TCJ financially solvent.

Only on rare occasion have past editors devoted space to look inward and reflect on TCJ, focusing instead on what the journal was founded for—sharing information and stories about tribal colleges and American Indian higher education. Still, there is a historical trail, even if it’s somewhat faint. Aspects of the development and the history of the journal have been chronicled in or can be gleaned from a handful of articles, essays, and book chapters. But most of the history is oral, residing only in the memories of all those who have served AIHEC and the tribal college community for the past 25 years. Below is a short list of resources that focus on the origin, evolution, and operations of Tribal College Journal.

References

Ambler, M. (1995). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 7 (2), 3.

Ambler, M. (1996a). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 7 (4), 3.

Ambler, M. (1996b). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 8 (1), 3.

Ambler, M. (1996c). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 10 (3), 3.

Ambler, M. (1999). Tribal College Journal Looks Ahead to Challenges of Second Decade. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 11 (1), 6–7.

Ambler, M. (2000). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 12 (2), 3.

Ambler, M. (2006). “Story Catcher” Remembers Walking Amongst Giants. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 18 (1), 8–9.

Ambler, M., & Boyer, P. (2009). The Role of Tribal College Journal in the Tribal College Movement. In L.S. Warner & G.E. Gipp (Eds.), Tradition and Culture in the Millennium: Tribal Colleges and Universities (pp. 189–200). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Bordeaux, L. (1989). Commitment to Community: An Introduction to This Journal. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 1 (1), 3–4.

Bordeaux, L. (2014). Our Vision Is Reality: Celebrating 25 Years of Tribal College Journal. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1), 10–11.

Boyer, P. (1995). Thinking About the Future. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 7 (1), 4.

Boyer, P. (2014). Origin Story: The Genesis of Tribal College Journal. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1), 22–23.

Deschenie, T. (2009). At 20, We Celebrate the Best and the Brightest of Tribal College Journal. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 21 (1), 10–11.

Deschenie, T. (Ed.). (2009). Anniversary Accolades: TCJ Founders, Readers, Professors Reflect on Two Decades. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 21 (1), 82–84.

Gipp, G.E. (2004). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 16 (1), 3.

Gipp, G.E. (2006). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 18 (1), 3.

Hernandez, J.A. (2009a). The Birth of TCJ: Father’s Curiosity Launched Paul Boyer on His Journey into Indian Country. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 21 (1), 22–24.

Hernandez, J.A. (2009b). Reciprocating Generosity. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 21 (1), 26–28.

McDonald, J. (2014). A Tribute to Paul Boyer. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1). Retrieved from www.tribalcollegejournal.org

Marchbanks, R. (2012). Dear Readers. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 23 (4), 3.

Marchbanks, R. (2014). Leaning In to the Digital Age: Tribal College Journal Embraces the Next 25 Years. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1), 40–41.

Shreve, B. (2014a). Proud of Our Heritage. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1), 12–13.

Shreve, B. (2014b). 25 Years of Tribal College Journal: An Editorial and Graphic Retrospective, 1989–2014. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1). Retrieved from www.tribalcollegejournal.org.

Talahongva, P. (2009a). Far From City Lights: Current TCJ Staff Brings Variety of Talents, Enthusiasm for Their Work. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 21 (1), 32–36.

Talahongva, P. (2009b). From the Past, Into the Future: Journeying Through 20 Years of Tribal College Journal. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 21 (1), 14–18.

Winn, R. (2014). The Meeting Place. Tribal College: Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 26 (1). Retrieved from www.tribalcollegejournal.org

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