24-4 Summer 2013 “Language Revitalization” Resource Guide

May 15th, 2013 | By | Category: 24-4: Language Revitalization, Online resource guides, Resource Guides, Web Exclusive
By Laura Paskus

While reporting one of the stories in the current issue of Tribal College Journal, I had the opportunity to speak with Chief Dull Knife College president Richard Littlebear. Littlebear is a leader in language revitalization, not only on the Northern Cheyenne reservation, but across North America.

I kept recalling our conversation. Many of the linguists who study Native languages, he said, talk about how the languages are dying. “I think that puts a lot of doom and gloom on our efforts,” he said. “Linguists should say, ‘We’re helping to save these languages.’” The irony, he pointed out, is that many people have directed their energy and efforts toward dissecting languages, rather than saving them.

And while much of the literature on language revitalization and restoration does focus on loss, that is starting to change. More Native communities and tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) are implementing language programs and creating language schools and classes for young people.

The resources below offer just a taste of the available literature concerning language revitalization and restoration. But perhaps the best place to start is by contacting your local tribal college or university and finding out what programs and ideas people there are offering. For a complete list of TCUs, see the Directory at the end of this issue or visit: www.tribalcollegejournal.org/tribal-colleges.

Articles and Book Chapters

Ambler, M. (Ed.). (2000). Native Languages [special issue]. Tribal College Journal, 11(3).

Anonby, S. (1999). Reversing language shift: Can Kwak’wala be revived? In J. Reyhner, G. Cantoni, R. N. St. Clair, & E. P. Yazzie (Eds.), Revitalizing Indigenous languages (pp. 33-52). Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University.

Begay, S., Dick, G., Estell, D., Estell, J., McCarty, T. L., & Seils, A. (1995). Change from the inside out: A story of transformation in a Navajo community school. Bilingual Research Journal, 19(1), 121-139.

Benham, M., & Mann, H. (2003). Culture and language matters: Defining, implementing, and evaluating. In M. Benham and W. Stein (Eds.), The Renaissance of American Indian higher education: Capturing the dream (pp. 167-192). London: Routledge.

Berlin, L. (2000). The benefits of second language acquisition and teaching for Indigenous language educators. Journal of American Indian Education, 39(3), 19-35.

Cantoni, G. (1997). Keeping minority languages alive: The school’s responsibility. In J. Reyhner (Ed.), Teaching Indigenous Languages (pp. 1-9). Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University.

Cantoni, G. (1999). Using TPR—storytelling to develop fluency and literacy in Native American languages. In J. Reyhner, G. Cantoni, R. N. St. Clair, & E. P. Yazzie (Eds.), Revitalizing Indigenous languages (pp. 53-58). Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University.

Crawford, J. (1996). Seven hypotheses on language loss, causes, and cures. In J. Reyhner, G. Cantoni, R. N. St. Clair, & E. P. Yazzie (Eds.), Revitalizing Indigenous languages (pp. 33-52). Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University.

Dauenhauer, N., & Dauenhauer, R. (1998). Technical, emotional, and ideological issues in reversing language shift: Examples from Southeast Alaska. In L. Grenoble & L. Whaley (Eds.), Endangered languages: Current issues and future prospects (pp. 57-98). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Eisenlohr, P. (2004). Language revitalization and new technologies: Cultures of electronic mediation and the refiguring of communities. Annual Review of Anthropology, 33, 21-45.

Fishman, J. A. (1996). Maintaining languages: What works and what doesn’t. In G. Cantoni (Ed.), Stabilizing Indigenous languages (pp. 186-198). Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University Center for Excellence in Education.

Gipp, G. (2003). Foreward. In M. Benham & W. Stein (Ed.), The Renaissance of American Indian higher education: Capturing the dream (pp. xiii-xvi). London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Hinton, L. (2003). Language revitalization. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 23, 44-57.

Holm, A., & Hohn, W. (1995). Navajo language education: Retrospect and prospects. Bilingual Research Journal, 19(1), 141-167.

Howard, E. R., & Loeb, M. I. (1998). In their own words: Two-way immersion teachers talk about their professional experiences. ERIC Digest, EDO-FL-98014.

Howard, E. R., & Sugarman, J. (2001). Two-way immersion programs: Features and statistics. ERIC Digest, EDO-FL-01-01.

Keami, S. (2000). Advocating for a stimulating and language-based education. In M. Benham & W. Stein (Eds), Indigenous educational models for contemporary practice: In our mother’s voice (pp. 51-59). London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Kipp, D. (2000). Commitment to language-based education. In M. Benham & W. Stein (Eds.), Indigenous educational models for contemporary practice: In our mother’s voice (pp. 62-69). London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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