4-4 Spring 1993 “The Pattern of Language” Table of Contents

Feb 15th, 1993 | By | Category: 4-4: The Pattern of Language, Archives

4-4 COVERFeatures

Finding a Place for Navajo
English must be kept out of some conversations, argues Navajo linguist Clay Slate. TCJ PAID CONTENT

Culture with Literacy
An interview with linguist Bill Leap.
By Paul Boyer TCJ PAID CONTENT

Healing the Generations
Writer and photographer Eric Haase chronicles the loss and recovery of the Lakota language in one family. TCJ PAID CONTENT

Lakota Language Survival and Restoration
Nearly erased in boarding schools, the Lakota language is being celebrated by a new generation of educators.
By Lydia Whirlwind Soldier TCJ PAID CONTENT

Departments

Profiles: Beating the Odds
By Marjane Ambler TCJ PAID CONTENT

Legislation: Executive Orders
By Stephen Amato TCJ PAID CONTENT

Research: A Specialized Knowledge Base for Teaching American Indian and Alaska Native Students
By Jon Reyner, Harry Lee and David Gabbard TCJ PAID CONTENT

Tribal College News

Media Reviews
By Schuyler Houser

ON THE COVER: Exact translations are sometimes difficult in Native languages. However, approximate translations were made of “the pattern of language “into Lakota and Ojibwe.

The Lakota phrase, provided by Sinte Gleska University Lakota Studies Chair Albert White Hat, translates as “these spoken languages are different from each other.”

The Ojibwe translation, provided by Elma Wilkie and Jimmy Greatwalker of Turtle Mountain College, means the speaking of Ojibwe.

Cover illustration by Bob Lynch for In Cahoots, Inc.

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