23-2 “Climate Commitment” Resource Guide

Nov 3rd, 2011 | By | Category: 23-2: Climate Commitment, Online resource guides, Resource Guides, Web Exclusive
By Michael Wassegijig Price

In researching information for the Resource Guide for Climate Change in Indian Country—as it relates  specifically to Indigenous peoples of the United States and Canada—I discovered that there isn’t much information out there yet!

This specific body of literature, research, and resources is only beginning to ignite across the country as Indigenous scholars, activists, and wisdom keepers begin this dialogue within their communities.  The voices of Indigenous peoples, from tribal college students and tribal resource managers to tribal council members and concerned elders, need to be heard during the onset of this critical time in our existence.

As I write this article, papers are being drafted, community meetings are being held, research projects are being proposed, and visions and dreams are being articulated.  There is a lot of energy in the air as we mobilize our hearts and minds around this issue of climate change.

This Resource Guide includes online resources, organizations, degree programs, books, and peer-reviewed journal articles specifically related to North American Indigenous peoples, but these are only stepping stones toward a much greater effort by Indigenous peoples worldwide to assert their sovereignty and self-determination and share their earth-centered wisdom as responsible global citizens of an impacted Earth.

Online Resources

Tribal Climate Newsletter
www4.nau.edu/tribalclimatechange

Published by Northern Arizona University, this is the best up-to-date monthly newsletter.  It provides information on current issues in climate change and renewable energies, conferences, proceedings, educational resources, webinars, and funding opportunities.  This newsletter is highly recommended.

The United States Global Change Research Program
www.globalchange.gov

The organization provides the current research on climate change from the U.S. federal government.  The USGCRP is responsible for producing the National Climate Assessment, which will include perspectives and observations from Native Americans and tribal governments in the United States.

Tribal Climate Change Network
http://tribalclimate.uoregon.edu

This is a collaborative project between the University of Oregon Environmental Studies Program and the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Climate Change and the Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Project
http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/climate.html

Indigenous Environmental Network
www.ienearth.org

Global Green Indigenous Film Festival, National Tribal Environmental Council (NTEC)
www.ntec.org

Formerly known as Indigenous Earth Film Festival

Climate Wizard by the Nature Conservancy
http://climatewizard.org

This interactive climate model allows one to play with different climate scenarios to better understand climate simulation modeling.  This is a user-friendly website.

NASA Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop – Final Report
http://www.usgcrp.gov/usgcrp/Library/nationalassessment/native.pdf

This was the historic meeting that brought climate scientists and North American Indigenous peoples together for the first time to discuss the changing environment.  The observations of Indigenous peoples, especially those from the Arctic regions, were acknowledged by the scientific community.  The entire final report can be downloaded via pdf from the U.S. Global Change Research Program website (www.usgcrp.gov).

Organizations

American Indian Alaska Native Climate Change Working Group
www.haskell.edu/climate/index.html

The American Indian Alaska Native Climate Change Working Group was founded in 2006 by Dr. Daniel Wildcat of Haskell Indian Nations University.  This is a proactive gathering of tribal college students, faculty, researchers and government officials who are working to identify climate change impacts to tribal lands and indigenous peoples.

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