1983 - Northwest Indian College is chartered1984<br>• Bay Mills Community College is chartered<br>• Fort Belknap College is chartered1985 - Stone Child College is chartered1986<br>• Henrietta Mann, first BIA official to testify in support of tribal colleges<br>• Red Crow Community College is chartered<br>• AIHEC creates the Student Congress1987 - Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College is chartered1988 - Institute of American Indian Arts gets Congressional charter 1884 - Haskell opens as a Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) boarding school 1962 - Institute of American Indian Arts is created by BIA 1968<br>• Navajo Community College (now called Diné College) is chartered <br>• United Tribes Technical College is chartered 1971<br>• Congress approves Navajo Community College Act<br>• D-Q University is chartered<br>• Oglala Lakota College is chartered<br>• Sinte Gleska University is chartered<br>• Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute is chartered 1972 - Turtle Mountain Community College is chartered 1973<br>• Sitting Bull College is chartered<br>• Six tribal colleges charter AIHEC and open office in Denver 1974<br>• Blackfeet Community College is chartered<br>• Cankdeska Cikana Community College is chartered<br>• Si Tanka Huron College is chartered<br>• Fort Berthold Community College is chartered 1975<br>• Congress passes the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, as proposed by President Nixon<br>• BIA testifies against need for tribal colleges<br>• Chief Dull Knife College is chartered<br>• Keweenaw Bay Community College is chartered 1976 - Black Caucus and U.S. Rep. Shirley Chisholm support tribal college funding 1977 - Salish Kootenai College is chartered 1978<br>• U. S. Congress passes the Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act<br>• Fort Peck Community College is chartered 1979<br>• Crownpoint Institute of Technology is chartered<br>• Nebraska Indian Community College is chartered<br>• Sisseton Wahpeton College is chartered 1980 - Little Big Horn College is chartered 1981 - First AIHEC Student Conference held in Rapid City, SD. 1982 - Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College is chartered 1983 - Northwest Indian College is chartered 1984<br>• Bay Mills Community College is chartered<br>• Fort Belknap College is chartered 1985 - Stone Child College is chartered 1986<br>• Henrietta Mann, first BIA official to testify in support of tribal colleges<br>• Red Crow Community College is chartered<br>• AIHEC creates the Student Congress 1987 - Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College is chartered 1988 - Institute of American Indian Arts gets Congressional charter 1989<br>• American Indian College Fund incorporates<br>• AIHEC creates the Tribal College Journal 1990<br>• Tribal college librarians hold first Professional Development Institute<br>• Leech Lake Tribal College is chartered 1993 - College of Menominee Nation is chartered 1994<br>• U.S. Congress passes the Equity in Education Land-Grant Status Act granting 29 tribal colleges land-grant status<br>• AIHEC purchases its own office building in Alexandria, VA 1995 - W.K. Kellogg Foundation launches Native American Higher Education Initiative 1996<br>• President William J. Clinton signs Executive Order 13021 on tribal colleges<br>• White House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities office is created<br>• Little Priest Tribal College is chartered 1997 - White Earth Tribal and Community College is chartered 1998 - U.S. Congress Passes the Strengthening Tribal College Program in Title III •
of the Higher Education Act 1999<br>• AIHEC partners with Black and Hispanic serving colleges to form the Alliance for Equity in Education 2000 - President Clinton is first president to visit a tribal college (Diné College) 2002<br>• President George W. Bush signs Executive Order 13270 for tribal colleges and universities<br>• Congress enacts the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act, recognizing TCU land-grant institutions as eligible to compete for USDA integrated research, education, and extension competitive grants; authorizes the TCUs Essential Community Facilities Grant program; and adds White Earth Tribal and Community College to the statutory list of 1994 land grant institutions. 2003<br>The First Americans Land-grant Consortium (FALCON), a membership association of TCU land-grant administrators, faculty and staff, is established and then officially endorsed by the Board of Directors of AIHEC.
2004<br>• Pawnee Nation College established (first classes held 2005)<br>• 10th Anniversary of TCUs securing Federal Land Grant Status. Congress adds Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College and Tohono O’odham Community College to the statutory list of 1994 land grant institutions. 2005<br>• Comanche Nation College, established in 2002, becomes first Oklahoma associate member of AIHEC<br>• College of the Muscogee Nation, which started classes in 2004, becomes associate member of AIHEC<br>• Wind River Tribal College, chartered in 1997, starts admitting its own students and becomes associate member of AIHEC<br>• California’s D-Q University losses accreditation, but continues to offer workshops and study opportunities 2007 - Congress enacts the College Cost Reduction and Access Act, establishing formula funding of the TCU Title III program; includes $60 million of mandatory funds for TCU HEA Title III program. 2008 - Congress adds Ilisagvik College to the statutory list of tribal college land grant institutions. 2009<br>• AIHEC secures forward funding of institutional operations grants under the Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities Assistance Act.<br>• Tribal college and university enrollment reaches 19,070 2013 - AIHEC celebrates 40th anniversary! 2012 - Red Lake Nation College begins construction of $11 million new campus on shores
of Red Lake; construction expected to be completed in 2014. 2011<br>• 2011 President Barack Obama signs Executive Order 13592, 'Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities.'<br>• Red Lake Nation College, chartered in 2001, becomes associate member of AIHEC 2010 - 2010 Congress enacts the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act, which includes an additional $300 million of mandatory funding for the TCU HEA Title III program.