In the Current Issue: Volunteerism

In the Current Issue: Volunteerism

At tribal colleges and universities, students, faculty, and staff have deep connections to their local communities, inspiring them to work toward their improvement. This fall issue of Tribal College Journal explores the spirit of volunteerism as it is manifested in a variety of programs, initiatives, and campaigns.

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All Efforts Count

All Efforts Count

By Bradley Shreve

As volunteers we can all make a difference—sometimes it’s just a matter of taking that first step.

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In the Service of Others: How Volunteering is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

In the Service of Others: How Volunteering is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

By Patty Talahongva

Today, the spirit of volunteerism is very much alive at every tribal college and university. From fundraisers for food pantries to educational activities to help fellow students, TCUs help forge reciprocity among students and staff.

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Through Our Eyes: Narratives of Three Student Volunteers at Aaniiih Nakoda College

Through Our Eyes: Narratives of Three Student Volunteers at Aaniiih Nakoda College

By Kerri Patrick Wertz
Despite overwhelming familial responsibilities, work obligations, and academic demands, tribal college students embrace the passion for serving their community as volunteers. Three such stories from ANC teach us that volunteer work can coincide with individual passion and interest.

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Wolakolkiciyapi:The Lakota Leadership and Management Program at Oglala Lakota College

Wolakolkiciyapi:The Lakota Leadership and Management Program at Oglala Lakota College

By Richard Iron Cloud

A college education is about more than just job preparation. Oglala Lakota College’s leadership and management graduate program stresses traditional Lakota values by encouraging students to give back to their community.

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Ve’stahe’m Among the Northern Cheyenne

Ve'stahe'm Among the Northern Cheyenne

By Gail Small

To be tribal is to be a volunteer.

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2016 TCJ Student: Our Literary Homes

2016 TCJ Student: Our Literary Homes

Edited by Joan Naviyuk Kane
The acclaimed Inupiaq author and poet guest edits the 2016 edition and illuminates how tribal college students construct literary homes through their stories and poems.

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Web Exclusive Feature

Stand with Standing Rock: A Call to Action for Tribal Colleges and Universities

Deborah His Horse Is Thunder with photos by Iris Pretty Paint

The historic events at Standing Rock underscore the importance of intertribal solidarity, while offering TCUs a unique opportunity for learning.

TCJ Student

Edited by Joan Naviyuk Kane

Tribal college students from around Indian Country competed in this year's creative writing, art, and film contest.

Current Reflections

Rick Williams

The former president of the American Indian College Fund shares his insights on the importance and uniqueness of volunteerism at tribal colleges.

Web Exclusive Interview

From Tsaile to Kayenta

In this TCJ-exclusive interview, Diné College student Dallas Peterman discusses his 95-mile trek cleaning up the highways of the Navajo Nation.

Web Exclusive Feature

Nahkohenexahe: The Remarkable Story of Henry Littlewhiteman, as Told by Eugene Limpy

Transcribed by Gail Small

Elder Eugene Limpy recalls the selfless efforts of Henry Littlewhiteman in this remarkable oral history.

Writer's Corner

The Truth About Poetry

By Ryan Winn

Poetry is power, and today the absence of confining genre rules means we're living in a time of poetic freedom that's unlike any other.

Tribal College News

Northwest Indian College to Host Local Environmental Observers Network Program Northwest Indian College to Host Local Environmental Observers Network Program

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced an interagency agreement on treaty rights and other initiatives designed to advance tribal sovereignty and self-determination. The development will have far-reaching implications for Northwest Indian College (NWIC), which is located on the Lummi reservation in western Washington State. At the White House Tribal Nations Conference in Washington, (more)

College Fund Publication Shares Ways to Help Native Students Succeed College Fund Publication Shares Ways to Help Native Students Succeed

At just over 13%, American Indian students have the lowest college graduation rate in the United States. In a new publication from the American Indian College Fund, several tribal colleges and universities share how to create systems and structures to promote Native student success. The publication, titled, Achieving the Dream: Improving Student Success at Tribal (more)

United Tribes Offering New Programs United Tribes Offering New Programs

United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) is offering four new programs this fall, including one new bachelor’s degree program. The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) approved UTTC’s request to offer a Bachelor of Science in environmental science and research. The four-year program will be taught at the new Science and Technology Center. The college began conferring bachelor’s (more)

Tribal College News Roundup

Tribal Colleges Partner with Montana State University

Dinosaurs, digital storytelling, cultural collaboration and social services support make up the four projects that recently received seed funding from a Montana State University organization that promotes outreach and engagement between MSU and the community.


White Earth Tribal and Community College Expects Growth White Earth Tribal and Community College Expects Growth

Scheduled for completion at the end of May, the new wing will house an expanded library and classrooms equipped with technology for distance education. This will allow WETCC to expand course options for students via remote access to classes offered at other tribal colleges. The expansion also offers new office space for faculty and Student Services.


Hoop Dreams Helping Tohono O’odham Community College Student Come of Age

TOCC had recently been approved as a GED testing center, and Chavez became the first person to take the test there and pass it. He joined the basketball program, and as a member of the T-O nation, he’d have school paid for.


Opinion

Ve'stahe'm Among the Northern Cheyenne

By Gail Small
To be stribal is to be a volunteer. (more)

Resource Guides

27-4 Summer 2016 “Good Medicine” Resource Guide

Native Culture, Health, and Education: An Annotated Bibliography Below is a listing and description of key sources in the field of health and wellness in Indian Country. Brave Heart, M. (2003). The Historical Trauma Response among Natives and Its Relationship with Substance Abuse: A Lakota Illustration. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 35(1), 7-13. Brave Heart describes (more)

Media Reviews

This Benevolent Experiment: Indigenous Boarding Schools, Genocide, and Redress in Canada and the United States This Benevolent Experiment: Indigenous Boarding Schools, Genocide, and Redress in Canada and the United States

By Andrew Woolford
University of Nebraska Press (2015)
445 pages
Review by Jon Reyhner

Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery

By Margaret Ellen Newell
Cornell University Press (2015)
316 pages
Review by Colin G. Calloway

Falling into Place: A Memoir of Overcoming Falling into Place: A Memoir of Overcoming

By Hattie Kauffman
Baker Books (2013)
240 pages
Review by Rachael Marchbanks

So, How Long Have You Been Native?: Life as an Alaska Native Tour Guide So, How Long Have You Been Native?: Life as an Alaska Native Tour Guide

By Alexis Bunten
University of Nebraska Press (2015)
251 pages
Review by Medeia Csoba DeHass